Still have active destination URLs in Bing Ads? It’s time to migrate to final URLs

Still have active destination URLs in Bing Ads? It's time to migrate to final URLs

If you have any older campaigns running on Bing Ads, now’s a good time to double check if you have any lingering standard text ads and destination URLs still active. You won’t be able to create new destination URLs as of August, and by the end of the year, destination URLs will be phased out entirely, the company announced Thursday.

Bing Ads added support for final (aka Upgraded) URLs globally in August 2016, so many advertisers have likely made the shift, but certainly not all.

What you need to do. You’ll need to convert any standard text ads to expanded text ads (select Edit from the Ads tab in the web interface) and put your landing page URL in the Final URL field. If you’re using destination tracking, you’ll put that in the Tracking template field under Ad URL options.

If you have any keyword-level or sitelink destination URLs, switch those to Final URL, too. You can also make these moves in bulk Bing Ads Editor. See the bottom of this help page for details.

Why we should care. If you aren’t running any legacy standard text ads any more, you probably won’t have to take any action — but still better safe to check. Expanded text ads offer more characters than the old standard text ads, and can now include three headlines and two description lines. The benefit of Final URLs is that separating the tracking parameters from the URL makes it possible to update tracking across multiple URLs once and changes to tracking templates don’t require ads to go back for editorial review. Bing Ads will also soon support parallel tracking which can help landing pages to load faster by enabling the user’s browser to issue two simultaneous but separate requests to the landing page and the ad click measurement server.


About The Author

Ginny Marvin is Third Door Media’s Editor-in-Chief, managing day-to-day editorial operations across all of our publications. Ginny writes about paid online marketing topics including paid search, paid social, display and retargeting for Search Engine Land, Marketing Land and MarTech Today. With more than 15 years of marketing experience, she has held both in-house and agency management positions. She can be found on Twitter as @ginnymarvin.

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Google investigating a new indexing bug – this time with Google News

Google investigating a new indexing bug – this time with Google News

Google said they are investigating yet another indexing bug, this time with Google News content.

Unrelated to last week’s indexing bug. Google said this new indexing bug is “not related to last week’s indexing issue, which was resolved.” According to Google, the new bug is only impacting certain Google News publishers.

Publishers may recall last November’s discovery issue with Google News, wherein publisher content wasn’t being indexed with relevant queries. Currently, it’s unclear if this new indexing bug is related.

Indexing few publishers. Google said this new indexing bug is only impacting a “limited number of publishers.”

Investigating now. Google also added that they are currently investigating the issue and will report back when they know more. “We’re actively diagnosing the news issue now,” Google wrote.

Why we should care. If you have content published to Google News, you may be impacted by this indexing bug and should take steps to make the content available elsewhere if that’s the case.

Google is working on solving the issue – but we’ll be on the lookout until then.


About The Author

Barry Schwartz is Search Engine Land’s News Editor and owns RustyBrick, a NY based web consulting firm. He also runs Search Engine Roundtable, a popular search blog on SEM topics.

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Hello peak martech: 2019 Marketing Technology Landscape growth slows for first time

Hello peak martech: 2019 Marketing Technology Landscape growth slows for first time

SAN JOSE, CA — The number of companies encompassed in the famous Marketing Technology Landscape did not grow by double digits for the first time in eight years, with the 2019 Marketing Technology Landscape including 7,040 companies, an increase of just three percent from 2018.

Lead author and MarTech Conference chair Scott Brinker, unveiled the 2019 Martech Landscape during a keynote address at the conference in San Jose Thursday.

“The immediate reaction would be, This is it, we’ve reached peak martech,” said Brinker in an interview earlier this week. “But what it comes down to isn’t so much peak martech. It’s peak martech landscape.”

Brinker came to that conclusion after he began looking for martech in international markets and other sectors and found that the landscape misses a lot that’s happening in regional martech and the thousands of smaller solutions and apps available in various ecosystems of martech giants such as Salesforce, Oracle and HubSpot. “WordPress has an ecosystem of 54,000 plugins!” noted Brinker.

“We’ve hit the limits of what can be tracked down and included in one graphic,” he said, noting that the in proliferation of small point solutions and ecosystems is part of where he sees marketing technology heading.

Chiefly, in the new age of martech, Brinker sees the big ecosystems evolving into open platforms that are complemented by integrated, third-party apps; services firms offering more in the way of automated solutions; and the ability to create no- or low code solutions means marketers can create and customize point solutions to meet their specific needs. And all of these factors are propelled by the cloud.

Why you should care. “In some ways, forget about martech 5,000. Welcome to martech 50,000,” said Brinker, pointing to the hundreds of plug-and-play apps that are essentially mini martech products. “There are regional, vertical, ecosystems, services and citizen martech segments.”

The handful of behemoths — Adobe, Salesforce, etc. — that have made big acquisitions in recent years are also contributing to the explosion of what could be called micro-martech within their ecosystems. Not to mention the proliferation of services integrating with one another — consider Adobe’s recent partnerships with LinkedIn, Drift, Roku and ServiceNow.

More insights from the MarTech Conference

This story first appeared on MarTech Today. For more on marketing technology, click here.


About The Author

Ginny Marvin is Third Door Media’s Editor-in-Chief, managing day-to-day editorial operations across all of our publications. Ginny writes about paid online marketing topics including paid search, paid social, display and retargeting for Search Engine Land, Marketing Land and MarTech Today. With more than 15 years of marketing experience, she has held both in-house and agency management positions. She can be found on Twitter as @ginnymarvin.

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Overdone? Short EU equities ‘most crowded’ trade for first time

Overdone? Short EU equities 'most crowded' trade for first time

LONDON (Reuters) – Fund managers have named bearish bets in European equities as the “most crowded” trade in Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s survey for the first time in its history, suggesting sentiment for one of the world’s most shunned markets may rise from here.

FILE PHOTO: The German share price index DAX graph is pictured at the stock exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, March 12, 2019. REUTERS/Staff

Investors have pulled cash from European stocks over the past year, betting the market would be weaker compared with the United States and other regions as euro zone economic growth slows and Britain’s chaotic exit from the European Union raises concerns about disruption to its economy.

Short European equities replaced long emerging markets, which held the title for just one month.

The shift in investor views reflects broader uncertainty about the direction of financial markets as the Federal Reserve and ECB keep interest rates on hold amid signs that growth is slowing.

The results also suggest that fund managers believe the gloom that has seen $30 billion leave European equities this year may have been overdone.

In a note on Sunday, Morgan Stanley chief European equity strategist Graham Secker said he believes Europe is set to surprise on the upside as issues that weighed on growth in the second half of last year start to fade.

The pan-European STOXX 600 rose 0.7 percent on Tuesday to its highest since Oct. 3 and was on track for its longest winning streak in six months.

Auto stocks led the gains after the bank’s auto analysts recommended contrarian investors buy select carmakers after the survey showed investors grew more bearish on the sector.

Tentative improvements in consumer and wage data – and the improving German car sector – are a good omen, Secker said, noting that China, whose slowdown has been behind much of Europe’s malaise, is finally showing a turnaround in new export orders PMIs.

(GRAPHIC: Evolution of FMS “most crowded trade” – tmsnrt.rs/2UDJerA)

CHINA SLOWDOWN

Still, BAML’s March survey – conducted between March 8 and 14, among 239 panelists managing $664 billion in total – also indicated that investor risk appetite had continued to fall, with global equity allocations remaining at September, 2016 lows.

“The pain trade for stocks is still up,” said Michael Hartnett, BAML’s chief investment strategist.

“Despite rising profit expectations, lower rate expectations and falling cash levels, stock allocations continue to drop. There is simply no greed to sell in equities.”

A slowdown in China, the world’s No. 2 economy, topped the list of biggest tail risks, ousting the trade war, which had been investors’ main concern for the previous nine months, according to the survey.

Third on this month’s list was a corporate credit crunch.

The slight improvement in investor outlook toward the protracted trade war which has rattled markets for the past year comes as Washington and Beijing make progress in talks to agree a truce.

But reflecting the broad spectrum of views on interest rate policy, about 55 percent of those surveyed say they think the Fed will continue to hike, while 38 percent believe the hiking cycle is done.

Reporting by Josephine Mason and Helen Reid, Editing by Ed Osmond

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