Laying the foundation for experimentation-based digital marketing in healthcare

Laying the foundation for experimentation-based digital marketing in healthcare

The headlines are everywhere: biosensors, point-of-care diagnostics, artificial intelligence, next-generation sequencing—the healthcare industry is evolving rapidly. The way healthcare is marketed and delivered to consumers and patients? That’s another story.

The Current State of Digital Disruption in Healthcare

Overall, the global digital health market is growing steadily. In 2015, it was valued at $80B. By 2020, it’s expected to increase to over $200B. The estimated global electronic health records (EHR) and electronic medical records (EMR) market in 2020 alone is $24B. The forecasted global telemedicine market size in 2021? $41B.

Healthcare digital industry growth
Source.

Perhaps that explains why a 2018 study from Ernst & Young found that 91% of healthcare companies already had or planned to begin a digital health initiative within the next year to improve patient experience. How? 51% of healthcare companies said data analytics were the top initiative, followed closely by competitive benchmarking, among others.

Medical startups are securing ample funding in 2019. In fact, the total digital health industry funding worldwide in 2018 surpassed $14B.

Healthcare startups growth
Source.

A study conducted by a team of scientists last year indicates that the best way for large companies to approach digital disruption in healthcare is likely through collaboration. Corporations must learn from startups, and vice versa:

Digital transformation is an opportunity to accelerate health care performance by lowering cost and improving quality of care. At an economic scale, business models can be strengthened and disruptive innovation models enabled. Corporations should look for collaborations with start-up companies to keep investment costs at bay and off the balance sheet. At the same time, the regulatory knowledge of established corporations might help [startups] to kick off digital disruption in the health care sector.

The study looked at how technology corporations, life science companies and medical startups are investing in digital disruption. Technology corporations are investing heavily in adherence hardware and treatment platforms. Similarly, life science companies are investing heavily in adherence hardware and software. Treatment services are also becoming a priority.

Medical startups, on the other hand, are more diversified, actively exploring all six major customer needs: adherence, diagnostic, lifestyle, patient engagement, prevention, and treatment.

Healthcare startups areas of focus
Source.

With the proper funding in their pockets, the increasing demand and their diversified efforts, medical startups will only add to the mounting pressure to tackle digital disruption head-on.

Currently, however, most companies are falling short of consumer and patient expectations.

Michael Song from MedImmune presented some surprising numbers at Digital Pharma EAST late last year:

  • There are 325,000 health and fitness apps on the market.
  • Only 41 of them have more than 10M downloads on Google Play.
  • In fact, 85% have fewer than 5,000 downloads.
  • 50% of mHealth apps will never break even the 500 downloads mark.
  • Over 50% of apps see a usage drop-off rate of 64% after just 30 days.

Yet, according to a survey conducted by Transcend Insights, 64% of patients say they use a digital device (e.g. mobile apps) to manage their health. 71% believe it would be useful if their doctor could access that data as part of their medical records.

Again, the demand exists, but isn’t being met (yet). All of this information paints a clear picture: consumers and patients want the way healthcare is marketed and delivered to catch up to the pace at which healthcare as a whole is going digital, yet companies are consistently falling short of those expectations.

The tricky thing about this industry shift is the sheer number of factors to consider. For example, according to Bain and Co., the five pillars of digital disruption in healthcare are:

  1. The Amazon Effect: As non-traditional healthcare companies, like Amazon, enter the space, competition and innovation are heating up.
  2. The Digital Revolution: Tech innovations, such as smart devices and machine learning, are making digital treatment and care a reality.
  3. Regulatory Change: New and complex regulations, like the debate over the US Affordable Care Act, make for an unpredictable future.
  4. Consumerism: Consumers and patients have more choices than ever before.
  5. Personalized Medicine: Medical products and services will be increasingly tailored to specific consumers and patients based on their unique medical history.

This digital disruption is a healthcare evolution, not revolution. You will notice the impact in small pockets of the industry first, but it will continue to spread. The best time to start thinking about this shift was yesterday, but today is the second best.

What was going on in your business when you decided to start running experiments?

“It goes back to Providence’s mission. We’re here to help the poor and vulnerable, to ease their way. How can we make the experience as smooth as possible so consumers can get to the healthcare solution they need faster? Answering that question seemed like a really important, worthwhile task. A combination of analytic thinking with that desire to make the consumer’s way as seamless as possible prompted us to drive toward experimentation.”Marc Schwartz, Director, Growth Marketing at Providence Health and Services

John Ekman from Conversionista shared a few industry-agnostic tips for companies looking to chase digital transformation at CXL Live 2019:

  1. Digital transformation is a result, not a goal.
  2. Digital transformation is largely the result of combining momentum, proper resources and strategic evaluation.
  3. There are five ways to “go digital”: digitize the product itself, add a digital service layer to the product, digitize your processes, digitize your marketing and sales strategy, and come up with net new digital products.
  4. Allocate budget and resources to new projects first.
  5. Listen to what your consumers need, act quickly on those needs, and scale.

For the rest of the article, we’ll focus on how to digitize your marketing and sales strategy.

The Challenges of Digital Disruption in Healthcare

You will encounter a number of contextual challenges as you start to digitize your marketing and sales strategy, from stakeholder support to resourcing. Universally speaking, though, there are two major challenges that make going digital particularly difficult in healthcare: Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA); and the lack of a traditional online transaction in healthcare.

1. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA)

As Bain and Co. suggested above, regulations, both new and old, have a big impact on the healthcare industry. HIPAA and its Canadian counterpart, PHIPA, complicate the collection, use, and disclosure of personal health information.

These acts are incredibly wide-reaching and nuanced. HIPAA is designed to protect patient rights and promote the safeguard of electronic protected health information (e-PHI). Here is a high-level summary of what’s covered under HIPAA:

  • All e-PHI created or received must be kept confidential and available to those entitled to access.
  • Anyone with access to e-PHI must take all reasonable steps to identify and eliminate potential threats to the security (and integrity) of that e-PHI.
  • Anyone with access to e-PHI must take all reasonable steps to identify and eliminate potential impermissible uses, disclosures, alterations, or deletions.
  • Anyone with access to e-PHI must take all reasonable steps to ensure HIPAA compliance within their entire organization.

Here is a high-level summary of what’s covered under PHIPA:

  • Consent is required if you want to collect, use or disclose personal health information.
  • All personal health information is considered confidential and those in possession of it must take all reasonable steps to maintain its security.
  • Everyone has the right to access their personal health information at any time.
  • Everyone has the right to instruct those with their personal health information to not share it with others.
  • The rules around using personal health information for research, fundraising, and marketing purposes are even more rigorous and nuanced.
  • Everyone has the right to correct errors in their personal health information at any time.

There are a lot of gray areas here. These acts cover everything from a single practitioner medical office to multi-national health plans. What’s important for us, as marketers, to remember is this: PHIPA and HIPAA make sourcing usable data for marketing activities in the healthcare industry particularly difficult.

How have HIPAA restrictions impacted your strategy?

“HIPAA is always top of mind as it should be for healthcare companies. Consumer privacy is of top importance in dealing with such sensitive issues like health. It was interesting to learn In some of the research we did around personalization, that one of the assumptions that people have about healthcare companies is that we’re going to be trustworthy and reliable. Because HIPAA exists, that’s implicit.

We also found that consumers give more data use latitude to a healthcare company if it helps them. So it puts the onus on the healthcare company to ask, ‘Is what I’m doing helpful for the consumer?’ It should never just be helpful to you.” — Marc Schwartz

2. The missing transaction

As Marc Schwartz, Director of Growth Marketing at Providence Health and Services, explains, there is often a lack of a traditional online transaction in healthcare: “There’s no basket. There’s no actual care that happens on our site; the care happens in the doctor’s office. Our doctors and their services are our product. So how quickly and easily we get someone to a doctor’s office becomes really important. Your measures of success need to be different.”

This forces you to adopt a utilitarian mindset. Your visitors already know what they want to do and they’re already convinced they need to do it, they just want to get it done as painlessly as possible. They need to find a doctor with availability, they need to find a clinic close by, they need to book an appointment with a specialist, they need to understand the science behind their unique condition—you name it.

The burden of persuasion is lifted, but this forces added pressure onto your user experience (UX) and customer journeys.

Why Experimentation is the Crux of “Going Digital”

Think of experimentation as your emergency vehicle through this complex period of digital disruption. Why? There are the internal benefits, of course:

  • Experimentation brings voice of customer data to the forefront by prioritizing consistent research and improvement.
  • Experimentation encourages strategic resourcing and unbiased digital decision-making.
  • Experimentation processes can be applied to every element of your sales and marketing strategy.
  • Experimentation fosters a test and learn culture.

More importantly, though, experimentation benefits the end consumer.

Schwartz explains: “Experimentation has made us realize how many hoops we make our consumers jump through just to do a transaction, and how frustrating that is. Experimentation forces you to ask why and the more you ask why, the more you realize your language is confusing, the number of steps required is too daunting, you don’t give enough direction, etc. Frankly, experimentation has shown us how hard we’ve made it for consumers to do what they want to do.”

It’s not enough to simply “go digital”; you have to “go digital” effectively. That means a commitment to fine-tuning the UX and customer journeys, a job that’s never truly done, according to Schwartz: “In reality, our biggest competition is always the latest consumer experience that someone has had. That changes the playing field, you’re never done.”

If digital disruption and transformation is the destination, experimentation is the emergency vehicle with its lights on and sirens blaring. Without it, at best, your digital sales and marketing strategy will be stagnant. At worst, you will be making important business decisions based on bias and subjective opinion.

What’s the most valuable thing experimentation brings to the table, and why?

“It’s helped us understand what’s most important to consumers. The site doesn’t exist for us, it exists for our consumers. Experimentation is one form of research that gives you insight into the mind of the consumer, which then allows us to drive action and results.

One of the questions you have to ask when an experiment wins is why. What makes it a winner? Same thing when it loses. Why did it lose? Were you out of touch with the consumer? Winners and losers, research—it’s all an opportunity to listen to the customer and improve relevancy. If you’re not helpful to consumers, if you’re not of value to consumers… why do you exist, why are you here?” — Marc Schwartz

How to Lay the Foundation for Experimentation

Before you launch your first experiment, you want to master the basics and lay the groundwork for an effective experimentation program that will grow with you through your digital expansion. That means:

  1. Setting meaningful goals and defining your metrics.
  2. Defining scalable, repeatable processes for identifying and prioritizing opportunities.
  3. Mapping your existing customer journeys, defining your ideal customer journeys, and identifying gaps and opportunities.

1. Setting Your Goals

The lack of a transaction makes setting goals and defining metrics more tricky in healthcare than in other industries. Often, it means there are more customer journeys to account for, which means more conversion points to optimize. Take Swedish Medical Center, for example. Here’s their current “Find a Doctor” page:

Healthcare digital marketing example
The “Find a Doctor” funnel.

From here, a consumer might:

  1. Use the search function to find a doctor based on a number of different inputs.
  2. Find a doctor based on a single filter (e.g. “Specialty”) below.
  3. Call the 1-800 number to have a representative help you find a doctor over the phone.

Each of those three options leads the consumer down a separate customer journey to achieve the same result: finding the right doctor.

In e-commerce, on the other hand, you would have a more structured, linear funnel. The consumer visits the product page, they add the product to their cart, they enter their shipping and payment information, they review the order, they complete the purchase.

You need to get aligned on what’s important to you as an organization from the beginning. Is it as simple as the number of appointments booked? Is it how quickly visitors are able to book their appointment?

Ask yourself a few questions before moving on to step two:

  1. What metric restrictions exist currently? What’s feasible and what’s not? What will be feasible in the future? What’s worth investing in now to make things easier and more reliable in the future? For example, only some doctors have online appointment booking enabled on Swedish and Swedish has no control over the availability of the doctors.
  2. How comfortable are you with directional metrics and data? What’s your risk tolerance?

2. Defining Your Processes

Amateurs rely on hacks and tactics. They throw opinion after opinion at the wall to see what sticks. And sure, occasionally, they might get a big win. But they won’t know why or how to replicate the success. Instead, they’ll simply continue to throw more ideas at the wall.

A better way to approach experimentation is through repeatable, scalable processes that prioritize insights and learning. Pros design experiments in a way that brings value, regardless of whether or not the experiment won.

At WiderFunnel, we use the Infinity Optimization Process to generate experiment ideas and lift revenue:

Infinity Optimization Process (TM)
WiderFunnel’s Infinity Optimization Process™

On the green “Explore” side, we gather quantitative and qualitative data to generate informed experiment ideas. That means looking at old experiment results, diving into digital analytics, conducting user testing, interviewing consumers, etc. On the blue “Validate” side, we:

  • Prioritize experiment ideas from the “Explore” side.
  • Create hypotheses for our high priority experiment ideas.
  • Develop an experimentation plan and design the experiment.
  • Loop in UX/UI designers.
  • Conduct quality assurance for the experiment.
  • Run the experiment.
  • Analyze the results.

Note the infinity loop surrounding both sides! Experiment results feed back into the green “Explore” side.

Also, notice how the “Explore” side revolves around the airplane icon in the middle? That’s our LIFT Model®:

WiderFunnel’s LIFT Model details the 6 conversion factors.

By focusing on these six conversion factors when evaluating your website and conducting research, you will focus your efforts and avoid subjective opinion (as much as humanly possible, anyway).

We’re using this to drive smarter hypotheses that fuel experimentation. Research and experimentation go hand-in-hand. All of the data we collect… all of the website click data, all of the heatmap data, all of the feedback from visitors—we use every data source we can come up with to get to the heart and into the mind of the consumer. Then we drive experiments using that information.

— Marc Schwartz

The optimization and experimentation process looks a bit different at every company and you will undoubtedly end up tweaking it to suit your unique needs. What matters is that you’re relying on a process that you can run through repeatedly. Experimentation is the act of consistently, purposefully mining for minerals, not striking gold.

3. Mapping Your Existing Customer Journeys & Identifying the Opportunities

Now it’s time to map your existing customer journeys. What’s the current state of your website (or other digital asset)? Here are a few questions you should ask yourself at this stage:

  • Where are visitors arriving from?
  • What do visitors come here to do?
  • What am I asking them to do here?
  • How many steps stand between them and their end goal?
  • How many of them make it to step one, step two, step three, etc.?

This is where the LIFT Model comes in handy. You can evaluate the current state based on those six conversion factors as well: value proposition, relevance, clarity, urgency, distraction, and anxiety.

Using Behavioral Science to Gain a Deeper Understanding

Providence works with WiderFunnel’s behavioral science team to conduct in-depth research that illuminates the existing customer journey.

In one study, 10 participants were asked to complete four key tasks (find a doctor, find a location, schedule an appointment, and register for a class) on a Providence-owned website and on competitive websites.

The study had two parts:

  • Part 1: Task-based, unmoderated interview.
  • Part 2: Self-reflection questions. For example:
    • How easy or difficult was it to complete this task?
    • How would you rate your experience completing this task?

WiderFunnel’s team of behavioral scientists then examined all of the video recordings, and assigned ratings based on their observations of friction and ease. They also conducted a sentiment analysis based on what respondents were saying while attempting to complete each task.

Watching these 10 participants try to use their website has been invaluable to the Providence team. Seeing (and hearing) pain points, clarity gaps, distractions, etc. helped map their existing journeys and visualize their ideal journeys, effectively fueling their experimentation pipeline.

Once you have a firm understanding of the current state, you can move on to mapping your ideal customer journeys. Your job now is to imagine how you can get your visitors to what they want as quickly as possible. In other words, your job is to improve the user experience and your customer journeys.

Healthcare digital marketing customer journey example
An alternative to Providence’s original “Find a Doctor” funnel gives consumers the chance to “Book an Appointment”.

What does your research tell you about what your visitors want and how effectively you currently deliver that value to them? Are there any technical limitations or gaps that you need to solve for to bring your ideal state to life? Essentially, what opportunities exist for you to close the gap between these two states? Those opportunities are the breeding ground for your data-informed experiment ideas.

What results have you seen because of experimentation?

“We’ve definitely seen an increase in consumers moving through our doctor funnel and our location funnel. We’ve seen that we’ve eased the way of the consumer, which has led to big learnings overall.

We’re always looking for opportunities to anticipate intent and then meet that intent. Experimentation has helped us understand where we’ve gotten intent wrong. It helps solidify our thinking and also inspire our thinking.” — Marc Schwartz

Maybe your findings indicate you should experiment with something as simple as fewer steps, a shorter customer journey. Or maybe they indicate you should experiment with Tealium to provide your phone representatives with live, anonymous consumer data. Whatever the case may be, you’re ready to turn your opportunities into hypotheses, your hypotheses into experiments, your experiments into insights, and your insights into revenue.

Examples of customer journey improvements

We’ve improved Providence’s mobile hospital pages to increase engagement with nearly every action a user can take on that page, from finding additional information, getting directions, or calling the hospital itself.

Healthcare Digital Marketing Experiment Example 1

In another experiment on Providence’s location search funnel, improvements to the user interface (UI) dramatically improved engagement with all elements on the page. We were able to reduce frustrating back-and-forth visits to the second, third, fourth page of results, indicating a much better overall user experience.

Healthcare Digital Marketing Experiment Example 2

Tackling Digital Disruption with Experimentation

Digital disruption isn’t coming, it has arrived. (It’s even had a few years to unpack and make itself at home.) Here’s what healthcare companies can do to tackle it head-on:

  1. Recognize experimentation as the crux.
  2. Use the Infinity Optimization Process as inspiration to define relevant internal experimentation processes ahead of time.
  3. Map all existing customer journeys.
  4. Map all ideal customer journeys.
  5. Plug the gaps between those two states (existing and ideal) into the experimentation processes defined in step three.

The great thing about experimentation is that it’s a positive feedback loop. The more experiments you run, the higher the quality of your future experiments. It’s simply a matter of getting started—before you’re left behind.

Are you a marketer in the healthcare space, facing digital disruption? We’d love to hear from you! Leave your thoughts, challenges, questions, and strategies in the comments section below.

Author

James Flory

Senior Experimentation Strategist

Benchmark your experimentation maturity with our new 7-minute maturity assessment and get proven strategies to develop an insight-driving growth machine.

Get started

Source link

How to use domain authority for digital PR and content marketing Search Engine Watch

Study: How to use domain authority for digital PR and content marketing

Study: How to use domain authority for digital PR and content marketing

For the SEO community, Domain Authority is a contentious metric.

Domain Authority (DA) is defined by Moz as

“A search engine ranking score developed by Moz that predicts how well a website will rank on search engine result pages (SERPs). A Domain Authority score ranges from one to 100, with higher scores corresponding to a greater ability to rank.”

Some people say that this score does more harm than good because it distracts digital marketers from what matters. Improving your DA doesn’t mean you’re improving your rankings. Others tend to find it useful on its own as a quick way to determine the quality or trustworthiness of a site.

Here’s what I say, from a digital PR perspective, domain authority is valuable when you’re using it to compare sites relative to one another. In fact, DA provides value for us PRs and is incredibly useful to our work.

Think of it this way. There are more websites than ever before, about 1.5 billion to be exact and so in some ways, this means there is more opportunity for marketers to get their content out in the world and in front of new audiences. While most people think that journalism is dying out, an enlightening post on Recode by Rani Molla explains that “while job postings for journalists are off more than 10 percent since 2004, jobs broadly related to content have almost quadrupled.” 

In other words, if outreach is executed well, there are more places than ever to get your content featured and lead to driving traffic, broadening your audience, and improving your search ranking.

But even the most skilled PR teams can’t reach out to 1.5 billion sites. The knowledgeable ones know that you really only need one successful placement to get your content to spread like wildfire all over the Internet, earning links and gaining exposure for your brand in the process. With so many options out there, how do PR professionals know which sites to spend time targeting?

That’s where DA comes into play. When it comes to link building, content marketers know that not all backlinks and brand mentions are created equally. The value of a link or mention varies depending on the referring website. Moz’s DA score is a way for us PRs to quickly and easily assess the quality of the websites we target for our client’s content marketing campaigns.

Our team tends to bucket online publishers, blogs, and websites into three categories:

  • Top-tier
  • Mid-tier
  • Low-tier

Keep in mind, particularly with the new Moz update, when deciding who to pitch, you must take a holistic approach. While domain authority is an excellent way to quickly assess the quality of a website, a site’s DA can change at any minute due to a multitude of factors, so make sure you are also taking into account your goals, the site’s audience, social following, and reputation as well as Moz DA score. In response to a Marketing Land tweet about the new DA, Stevie Howard says it perfectly.

Screenshot of Stevie Howard's tweet in response to a Marketing Land tweet about the new DA

Top-tier sites

What constitutes a top-tier website? Can a top-tier site have a low DA? Potentially, but it’s uncommon.

When you look at the holy grail of media coverage, DA tends to align perfectly. Take, for example, the following seven major publishers that any brand or business would love to earn coverage on. The DA scores for all of these sites fall above 90. These sites all have an extremely large audience, both on-site and on social media.

List of top tier sites having a DA score of 90 and above

Our team at Fractl has an innate sense of the online publisher landscape, and the largest and most well-known content publishers out there all tend to have a domain authority above 90. This is what we consider to be the “top-tier”.

These publishers are difficult to place with because of their large audience, social following, and reputation, so for the best chance at earning organic press mentions on these sites, offer them authoritative, unique, exclusive, and newsworthy content.

Mid-tier sites

Mid-tier sites may not be the holy grail of news publishers, but they’re our bread and butter. This is where the majority of placements tend to happen. These publishers hit a sweet spot for digital PR pros—they’re not as sought-after as Buzzfeed and don’t deeply scrutinize pitches the way The New York Times does, but they have large audiences and tend to be much more responsive to content pitches.

I tend to categorize the mid-tier as publishers that fall within a DA of 66 to 89. Here are some examples of publishers that may be considered mid-tier.

List of mid-tier publishers that have a DA of 66 to 89

Low-tier sites

Don’t underestimate a low-tier site simply because of its domain authority. For example, it wasn’t long ago that personal finance website, Money-ish, had a DA of 1. Launched in 2017, it was first its own website before being absorbed as part of the larger MarketWatch domain. MarketWatch has a DA of 93, with social engagement as high as 12,294,777 in the last year. If you ignored Money-ish because of its DA when they first started, you would have missed out on a chance to get your content featured on MarketWatch as well as build relationships with writers that are now under the MarketWatch umbrella. There are all types of content, and most marketers can figure out which projects have “legs” and which have less appeal. These lower-tier sites are often very niche and the perfect home for content that is aimed towards smaller, more precise audiences. These lower-tier sites also tend to have a high engagement where it matters, your target audience. Consider the site’s community. Does this site have a ton of email subscribers or high comment engagement? Are they killing it on Instagram or on another social network? You never know which site will become the next Money-ish, either!

List of low-tier sites with DA below 60 or 65

Pitching differences for each tier

There are plenty of sites that fall within different ranges of domain authority that would be an excellent fit for your content. It all just depends on your goals. In Fractl’s latest internal study, we were able to identify trends in the way journalists respond to PR professionals, based on the DA of the site they write for.

Graph on how journalists respond to PRs based on their sites DA score

Observations

  • Feedback from writers working for sites with a DA lower than 89 was most likely to be complimentary of the content campaigns we pitched them.
  • The verbiage of their responses was also more positive on average than those from journalists working for publishers with a DA of 90 or above.

An example of the feedback we received that would be labeled as complimentary is,

“Thanks for sending this over, it fits perfectly with our audience. I scheduled a post on this study to go up tomorrow.”- Contributor, Matador Network (DA: 82)

Those of us that have been pitching mainstream publishers for a while know from experience that it’s often easier to place with websites that tend to fall in the mid to low-tier buckets. Writers at these publishers are usually open to email pitches and open to writing about outside content because such websites have less stringent editorial guidelines.

Conversely, publishers that fall into our definition of “high-tier” were less positive on average than writers working for publishers with a DA less than 90. On average, the higher the DA, the less positive the language becomes.

Why might that be? It makes perfect sense that publishers like The New York Times, CNN, TIME, and The Washington Post would be less positive. They’re likely receiving hundreds of PR pitches a day because of their popularity. If they do respond to a pitch, they want to ensure that they’re inquiring about content that would eventually meet their editorial guidelines, should they decide to cover it.

According to our study, when journalists at publishers with a DA of 90 or above do respond, they’re more likely to be asking about the methodology or source of the content.

An example of this feedback is from a staff writer at CNN.

“Thanks for sending along. I’m interested to know more about the methodology of the study.”

A response like this isn’t necessarily bad, in fact, it’s quite good. If a journalist is taking time to ask you more about the details of the content you pitched, it’s a good indication that the writer is hoping to cover it, they just need more information to ensure that any data-driven content is methodologically-sound.

Conclusion

Domain authority will continue to remain a controversial metric for SEOs, but for those of us working in digital PR, the metric provides a lot of value. Our study found a link between the DA of a site and the type of responses we received from writers at these publishers. High DA sites were less positive on average and requested research back methodologies more than lower-tier sites. Knowing the DA of a site allows you to:

  • Improve your list building process and increase outreach efficacy
  • Customize each outreach email you send to publishers of varying DAs
  • Anticipate the level of editorial scrutiny you’re up against in terms of content types and research methodologies
  • Optimize content you create to fit the needs of your target publisher
  • Predict the outcome of a content campaign depending on where you placed the “exclusive”

Remember, just because a site has a high DA, it doesn’t mean it’s necessarily a good fit for your content. Always be sure to take a holistic approach to your list building process. Keep in mind the social engagement of the site, the topics they cover, who their audience is, their editorial guidelines, and most importantly, the goals of you or your client before reaching out to any publisher solely based on domain authority.

Domenica is a Brand Relationship Manager at Fractl. She can be found on Twitter .

Related reading

On-site analytics tactics to adopt now Heatmaps, intent analysis, and more
How AI is powering real-time SEO research Insights and optimization
The SEO metrics that really matter for your business
How progressive web apps positively impact your SEO

Source link

Tactics for capturing voice of customer and building delightful digital experiences

Tactics for capturing voice of customer and building delightful digital experiences

If you want to deliver stellar customer experiences, you need to give customers a voice.

Why is that?

Because your customers want to see themselves on your website: Their pains, the solutions that will alleviate those pains, and their aspirations. And modern customers won’t settle for anything less than a perfect experience. With the amount of competition in today’s markets, if you don’t deliver delightful customer experiences—that are resonant and easy to use—it’s safe to bet someone else will.

But that’s not the only reason to seek out customer feedback. Customer feedback also helps you get out in front of bad PR that comes when unhappy customers turn to social media to vent about what your company is doing wrong. And vent they do: Zendesk data indicates that as much as 95% of customers will share their bad experiences with others, both online and off.

You should also keep in mind that customers not only desire A+ customer experience, but they’ll pay for it, too: RightNow research shows that 86% of shoppers say they are willing to pay up to 25% more for a better customer experience.

So how do you approach customer feedback in a way that’s both strategic and effective?

One simple method is to look to customer surveys and polls. These feedback sources are a direct line to your customers that make them feel heard and valued—and that provide you with rich customer data at the same time.

There are a variety of approaches and options around this type of data collection, which we’ll explore in detail in this post.

Decision-making: What’s happening behind the scenes?

Before we jump into the nuts and bolts of how to effectively gather customer feedback, let’s first take a moment to understand what’s happening behind the scenes when customers make buying decisions, as well as what influences those decisions. This will provide some context on why gathering customer feedback is so crucial.

The “BJ Fogg Behavioral Model”

The Fogg Behavior Model explains that three elements must come together at the same time for a behavior to occur: motivation, ability and trigger. When a behavior does not occur, at least one of those three elements is missing.

Bottom line: Behavior = motivation x ability x trigger.

Source: What causes behavior change [Infographic]

There are two sides to this:

  1. The ability side, which makes it very easy for the customer to take an action by reducing cognitive load, AKA mental strain.
  2. The motivation side, which is having the right copy, imagery, persuasiveness, and effectively communicating the benefits of your solution.

To create the necessary synergy, companies strive to strike a balance between making it easy for customers to buy and appealing to a buyer’s inner desires at the same time.

Casper does this well. Take a look at this landing page that nicely executes both sides of the equation:

usability and motivation Casper landing page example

Not only is the page clean and easy to navigate, but appeals are also made to the motivation of a customer shopping for mattresses (i.e. features, elements social proof, etc.)

Before you can execute an effective sales-driving resource like this for your own company, you need to know what motivators to touch on when constructing it.

So how can you tap into the science and make sure you’re connecting with customers so that it’s both easy and compelling for them to make a purchase?

That’s where polls and customer surveys come in.

Why use customer surveys and polls?

Surveys offer an opportunity to ask questions while a visitor is in a shopping mindset and help uncover pain points within the customer journey. They allow visitors to put their “ability” barriers into words that you can then translate into experiment hypotheses and/or improved experiences.

But that’s not all customer surveys do. These helpful forms of customer outreach also take customer research a step further and help teams get answers to specific questions that can inform processes and decisions moving forward.

customer survey setup example

Here’s what conversion expert Els Aerts, Managing Partner at at AGConsult, had to say about using customer surveys:

Everybody realizes by now that customer-centricity is crucial when it comes to growth. For me, that means listening to customers. That listening can take many forms. Surveys are one of the easiest and cheapest ways to reach out to your customers. With so many free and inexpensive tools out there, you don’t have an excuse not to use them.

Surveys help you learn about your users’ drivers and triggers and give you great insights into where you’re already doing okay and where you need to improve. In our conversion optimization projects, qualitative customer surveys have been an invaluable tool. Not only for discovering the ‘why’ behind issues we discovered through other research methods, but also as a source of inspiration for copy and A/B testing.

Surveys and polls are also effective as a proactive CX measure. In fact, data shows that most unhappy customers won’t take the time to reach out and share feedback on their own.

With this in mind, you can see why it makes sense to be proactive and to instead reach out to them via polls and surveys that anticipate customer concerns (before they start using said voice to shout angrily on social media.)

Types of customer surveys you can deploy

The next question, then, is: What types of customer surveys should you use to gather customer feedback? You have many options to choose from, but let’s look at a few popular types of surveys and the information they provide.

Voice of Customer Surveys

Voice of Customer surveys include insights collected directly from your customers and website visitors about your product or service.

These often come in the form of reviews or testimonials, focus groups, insights from in-house customer facing teams, or one-on-one customer interviews. In reviewing the data you collect through these surveys, you can spot patterns and trends that indicate which areas of your customer experience may need improvement.

If you had some magic power and were able to discover exactly what customers are craving, and if you also knew how to produce their dream product at a low price, then you would be guaranteed to get rich! Therefore, capturing the exact Voice of the Customer is like striking gold.

— Kai Yang, Author of “Voice of the Customer: Capture and Analysis”

The great thing about these surveys is that they help you harness the actual voice of the customer, which you can then put to good use in a variety of ways.

How to leverage your findings from voice of customer surveys:

  • Pinpoint value propositions you may not be aware of
  • Identify how customers talk about your product/service and mirror that back in website copy
  • Make marketing materials more persuasive by matching your customers’ language and tone

Expert copywriter and Copy Hackers founder Joanna Wiebe said of these surveys:

As a conversion copywriter, I’ve found that voice of customer data is the foundation of a high-converting message. The reason is complex but kinda simple too: people want to see themselves on the page. When visitors see themselves on the page, that’s good for reducing bounce, increasing engagement and ultimately converting more people. When they don’t see themselves-as in, when you dream up copy in your head or ‘collaborate’ on it around a boardroom table-they then have to do the hard work of figuring out if they’re in the right place, if you get them, if you have what they need, if their life will get easier in continuing to consider and/or buy from your brand, etc.

And when the visitor has to do that work, well, only the most motivated, driven visitor will move forward. Everyone else bails or gets frustrated and then bails. tldr: give your customers a voice and use what they tell you to help others say yes to you.”

Net Promoter Score

Net Promoter Score (NPS) surveys measure customer experience and helps predict business growth. Essentially, they help you keep a finger on the pulse of your company’s customer satisfaction at a high level.

Bill Macaitis, CMO of Slack, told SaaS Office Hours he thinks NPS is one of the most valuable marketing metrics that is often overlooked:

One metric that most marketers don’t measure frequently, but should, is Net Promoter Score. NPS is a leading indicator of future growth. The larger the number of advocates for product, the lower the customer acquisition costs for the company, and the more effective customer success team will be.

— Bill Macaitis, CMO of Slack

How does an NPS survey work?

This type of survey uses a simple 0-10 rating scale to answer the question: How likely is it that you would recommend [brand] to a friend or colleague?

nps survey calculation widerfunnel
Image source.

Responses are broken into three main categories:

  1. Promoters (9-10) are loyal brand evangelists who buy repeatedly and refer new customers.
  2. Passives (7-8) are satisfied but aren’t actively referring new customers. Not as loyal as Promoters, Passive are often susceptible to offers from brand competitors.
  3. Detractors (0-6) are unsatisfied customers who may spread the word about poor experiences with your brand, thus hurting your company’s reputation.

customer feedback nps widerfunnel

To calculate your Net Promoter Score, subtract your percentage of Detractors from your percentage of Promoters.

Net Promoter Scores can range from -100 to 100, but 2018 Temkin data shows the average NPS score is around 39.

How to leverage your findings from the Net Promoter Score survey:

  • Monitor customer satisfaction and potential future growth
  • Use it to spot unhappy customers (detractors) and follow up with them immediately
  • Use it as a benchmark for progress around your CX efforts

Customer satisfaction surveys

Customer satisfaction (CSAT) surveys are used to understand your customer’s satisfaction levels related to your organization’s products, services, or experiences.

Rather than skimming the surface, these take a deep dive into customer satisfaction around different aspects of CX (like product, marketing, social, content, etc.) and can be used to help predict customer retention, loyalty, and product repurchase.

customer satisfaction survey example netflix
Image source.

How to leverage your findings from customer satisfaction surveys:

  • Build responses into marketing decisions, UX improvements, and prioritization of CX efforts
  • Reduce churn by addressing common sources of turnover, frustration, or friction for customers

Frontline Solvers, a leading vendor of advanced analytics software, saw customer satisfaction surveys lead the way to impressive results. After partnering with WiderFunnel Strategist Michael St Laurent to launch online polls and customer surveys in conjunction with other research methods, they were able to boost registrations for the company’s software by 15%.

From the case study:

“Early in the engagement, Mike got permission from Frontline to run customer polls on the company’s product pages. He had a few initial ideas about problems that customers were experiencing. But he wanted to back this up with direct feedback from the customers themselves.

He set up several polls to try to answer the following questions:

  • Are customers getting the information they need to choose a product?
  • Do customers really understand which product is right for them
  • How could Frontline improve their product pages?
  • What are the differentiators that cause customers to choose Frontline over a competitor?
  • How do customers feel about payment terms and commitment?

Customer survey results – UX Case Study
Survey results indicated visitors to Frontline’s website weren’t certain of the correct next action to take.

Put customer feedback to work

The bottom line here is: If you’re working to become a customer-obsessed brand, part of that process has to be listening to your customers.

Surveys are a key part of any solid optimization strategy. They help to automate feedback collection, making this an ongoing process that constantly informs decisions via real, concrete data.

In future editions of this series, we’ll continue to explore how different brands are executing customer-centric experiences via customer support insights, analytics, and experimentation.

If you’re curious about how to step up your company’s customer experience strategy and get on the level of brands making waves (and money), stay tuned and sign up to get future editions in your inbox.

Author

Kaleigh Moore

WiderFunnel Contributor

In this 22-page guide, jam-packed with scientific theory and real-world examples, learn how to create an emotionally resonant customer experience.

Get your guide now

Source link

Searching for facts, directions, local businesses are top digital assistant use cases, says survey

Searching for facts, directions, local businesses are top digital assistant use cases, says survey

Nearly three-fourths (72 percent) of smartphone owners are using digital assistants, according to a new report from Microsoft. The findings are based on two surveys – one from mid-2018 that includes an international sample, and a 2019 follow-up involving 5,000 U.S. consumers. The study also found that 35 percent of the survey population had used “voice search” through a smart speaker.

Google and Apple tied for usage lead. In terms of usage market share, the report found Siri and Google Assistant tied at 36 percent, followed by Alexa (25 percent) and then Cortana (19 percent). The overwhelming majority of Cortana’s usage is on the desktop. These figures are not the same as device share. Google Assistant is available on more than a billion devices and Amazon dominates the smart speaker hardware market.

Top assistant use cases. Like many reports covering digital assistants, this one sometimes fails to make clear distinctions between smart speakers and smartphone usage. However, the report spends considerable time discussing smart speaker adoption and use cases.

In the context of that smart speaker discussion, Microsoft presents the following hierarchy of digital assistant usage:

  1. Searching for a quick fact — 68 percent
  2. Asking for directions — 65 percent
  3. Searching for a business — 47 percent
  4. Researching a product or service — 44 percent
  5. Making a shopping list — 39 percent
  6. Comparing products or services — 31 percent
  7. Adding items to a shopping cart — 26 percent
  8. Making a purchase — 25 percent
  9. Contacting customer service or support — 21 percent
  10. Providing feedback for a product/service — 19 percent

Some of the answers on this list (e.g., comparing products or services) suggest that respondents were commenting broadly about assistant usage – not just smart speakers. Indeed, the absence of responses such as “checking the weather” or “playing music” (answers common in other smart speaker surveys) suggests this as well.

The study found that 80 percent were “satisfied” with their digital assistant experiences (most likely on smart speakers this time), while 14 percent were “neutral” and only 6 percent were dissatisfied.

22 percent jump in ownership. In terms of smart speaker ownership, the 2018 survey discovered 23 percent of respondents had one. That number has jumped to 45 percent this year. Under the assumption that this is a U.S.-based population, that would mean roughly 112 million Americans today own at least one smart speaker, with an additional 26 percent saying they’re going to purchase one this year.

A very interesting finding surrounds brand-purchase intent. Amazon Echo has gained compared with 2018 and Google Home has lost share of intent to purchase. The number of people who said they want to buy a Google Home speaker declined from 58 percent in 2018 to 17 percent this year. It’s possible that the 58 percent bought Google Home devices, hence the drop. But the decline is noteworthy.

The Google Home Mini didn’t suffer the same decline in purchase intent. Finally, 26 percent of the audience said that they were interested in buying an alternative brand, which may include Sonos and the Apple HomePod, although that’s not clear from the report.

Digital assistant privacy concerns. A substantial minority (41 percent) of respondents said they had “concerns” about digital assistants — again, probably smart speakers here. Asked to elaborate, the top response was “that my personal information is not secure” (52 percent), followed by “that it is actively listening and/or recording me” (41 percent) and then “I don’t want my personal information or data used” (36 percent). These fears are not entirely unfounded, given recent revelations about Amazon employees listening to Alexa recordings — justified to improve voice recognition and understanding.

The surveys also asked about shopping using a digital assistant or smart speaker. Just over 41 percent said they had made a purchase through one or both channels (with 6.5 percent saying they didn’t enjoy it). The other roughly 59 percent had not made a purchase, with 27 percent in that group saying they that they were interesting making future purchases using assistants. More than half (54 percent) of respondents said they believed that digital assistants will help them make retail purchases within 5 years.

Why we should care. Both consumers and retailers expect smart speakers (and smartphone assistants) to become an important purchase channel in the next few years. The activities detailed in the list above argue that some search behaviors will transfer to voice channels over time.

There are clear implications for marketers, tied to voice optimization and other tactics. For example, if you’re a local service business there are specific things that must be done to appear in Google Home local listings. It’s also incumbent upon marketers to experiment with smart speakers to determine the most effective use cases for their brands and content.

Finally, certain shopping and commerce experiences may become common through smart speakers. Walmart’s updated voice grocery shopping experience represents a potentially successful voice-commerce model, involving list creation and reordering. 


About The Author

Greg Sterling is a Contributing Editor at Search Engine Land. He researches and writes about the connections between digital and offline commerce. He is also VP of Strategy and Insights for the Local Search Association. Follow him on Twitter or find him at Google+.

Source link

10 principles of digital accessibility for modern marketers

10 principles of digital accessibility for modern marketers

When we talk about digital accessibility as marketers, we’re talking about the intentional creation of an experience that can be accessed by as many people as possible.

Designing for digital accessibility means many things. It means designing for individuals with sensory or cognitive impairments. It means designing for people with physical limitations. It means designing for individuals who rely on adaptive and assistive technologies like screen readers or magnifiers to view digital content.

The key is building accessibility into your digital experience from the very start rather than bolting it on like an afterthought. Below, I’ve outlined some key accessibility principles to consider when creating your digital marketing materials.

Principles for developers

1.  Apply standard HTML semantics

Accessible design begins with standard HTML semantics. Standard HTML enables screen readers to announce elements on page so that the user will know how to interact with the contents. When HTML tags without semantical information are used–such as <div> and <span> for visual styling – the browser will display the elements as the developer intended, which unfortunately, may not be very helpful for the user.

Keep in mind that the user’s experience with a screen reader can vary greatly. For instance, using <div class=”h1”>Introduction to Semantics</div> or custom coding to override default browser styles will produce something that resembles a header. However, a screen reader will not understand or announce that the element as a header.

Key takeaways

  • Use standard HTML whenever possible so that screen readers will maintain the structure and content when reading aloud.
  • Use structural elements to group elements and to create separate regions on a page, such as header, navigation, main and footer. Screen readers recognize these structural elements and announce them to the user and allow for additional navigation between elements.

2. Enable keyboard navigation

All websites should be keyboard accessible because not all consumers can use a mouse or view a screen. In fact, according to WebAIM Low Vision, 60.4% of survey respondents always or often use a keyboard for web page navigation. Additionally, individuals with permanent or temporary loss of their hands or fine muscle control may also use a keyboard or modified keyboards for navigation.

For keyboard navigation to work, a user must be able to navigate through a page by moving from focus item to focus item. A user typically follows the visual flow, going from left to right and top to bottom, from headers to main navigation, to page navigation and lastly to the footer. When using a keyboard for navigation, enter activates a focused link, and the space bar activates a focused form element. Tab facilitates navigation between elements. Escape allows the user to close an element.

Knowing this, it’s important to consider the actions a user might take. The rule of thumb is that if you can interact with a focusable element using a mouse, make sure that you can interact using a keyboard. These elements might include links, buttons, form fields or a calendar date picker.

Key takeaways

  • Ensure users can navigate with the keyboard to all interaction components of the website. List all your site’s focusable elements and create easy-to-use focus indicators.
  • Structure underlying source code to correctly order the content and navigation. Use CSS to control visual aspects of the elements.
  • Allow users to bypass navigation windows if there are too many links in drop downs.

3. Use attributes

When it comes to linking text and descriptions for URLs, screen readers can skip from link to link within an article. If vague link text like “Click Here” or “Read More” is used, it provides very little context or meaning for someone to interpret on a screen reader.

Be specific and descriptive with your link text and include meaningful phrases that describe the content that the link is connecting to. Instead of “Contact us” use more specific language like “Contact our sales team.” For images and videos, assign ALT attributes and use descriptive file names.

Key takeaways

  • Banish extraneous and non-descriptive words in your links like “Click Here,” “Here,” and “Read More.” “10 Principles of Accessibility” reads better than “Click here to read the 10 principles of accessibility.”
  • Optimize file names and URL names and use both open and closed captioning for video content. Consider adding accurate video transcripts.

4. Use the ARIA label attribute

In some cases, the buttons or other interactive elements on your website may not include all the information needed for assistive technology. The ARIA label attribute enables assistive technology to override the HTML labels to allow the website owner to provide additional context to the element on a page.

In the following link example, a screen reader will announce “Bing Ads. Link.”

<a href=”…”> Bing Ads </a>

However, if the button itself is a call-to-action button, the site owner can use the ARIA label to allow the screen reader to speak the call-to-action text visible on the button. In this example, the screen reader will announce, “Sign Up for a Bing Ads Account. Link.”

<a href=”…” aria-label=”Sign Up for a Bing Ads Account”>Bing Ads</A>

Key takeaway

  • Use the ARIA label attribute within elements like forms and call-to-action buttons to define the visible text that a screen reader should read aloud.

5. Properly label and format forms

Make sure forms are intuitive and logically organized, with clearly identified instructions and labels. To ensure that users load the right keyboard format for all forms, use labels that are always visible and avoid putting placeholder text within form prompts.

From a formatting perspective, take advantage of borders for text fields and drop-down menus, and put forms in a single-column format. Also, use HTML input types, so users do not have to switch across types of virtual keyboards. For example, fields for phone numbers should pull up the numeric keyboard vs. a regular keyboard format.

Key takeaways

  • Be careful when using JavaScript in forms, which can make the form difficult to complete using a keyboard.

6. Use tables for data

There are two basic uses for tables online: data tables with row and column headers that display tabular data and tables for page layout. The intended use of HTML tables is for tabular data. Layout tables don’t typically have logical headers or information that can be mapped to cells within the table, so screen readers must guess the purpose of the table. For this reason, it’s important to use CSS for layout and reserve tables for data. Using CSS results in cleaner and more simplified HTML code.

Key takeaways

  • Use the appropriate mark-up for data tables and always include table headers. Always choose CSS over tables for page layout.

Principles for writers and graphic designers

7. Write content in a structured way

The structure and flow of your content are especially important for individuals who have a visual impairment and rely on screen readers. It’s also important for folks with cognitive and learning disabilities, as well as anyone scanning through content on a mobile screen. When writing for accessibility, summon your inner high-school English teacher and organize content clearly with descriptive headings for each section.

Key takeaways

  • Make text easy to read and logically structured. Be sure to use semantic markup for headings paragraphs, lists, and quotes.

8. Align to the left

Text alignment impacts readability, according to UX Movement. Centered text makes the viewer work harder because without the left straight edge, there is no consistent path for the eyes to follow when continuing to the next line of text. Use left-aligned text for a straight edge that makes it easier for the eyes to scan content and find breaks in the writing structure.

Key takeaways

  • Only use centered text headlines and short lines of text such as quotes and call outs. Avoid mixing text alignment.

9. Choose fonts judiciously

I love beautiful, artistic fonts. But the fact is that some fonts are easier to read than others. Which is why it’s important to use basic fonts. Sans-serif fonts are easier to read for people with visual or cognitive disabilities – even temporary, visual disabilities like reading a screen in bright sunlight.

Size also matters. Avoid font sizes smaller than 12 and choose absolute units (pixels or points) vs relative units (%) to define font size. Limit the number of fonts to make content easier to read. Don’t rely on the appearance of fonts (color, shape or placement) to convey the meaning of the text. Finally, avoid blinking or moving text – no user wants to chase a message around a screen.

Key takeaways

  • Choose simple fonts with plain, sans-serif endings, which make it easier for eyes to recognize letters.
  • Limit the use of font variations and sizes.

10. Put color to work

The application of color also impacts accessibility. According to a 2018 survey of users with Low Vision by WebAIM, 75% of respondents report multiple types of visual impairment, including 61% with light or glare sensitivity and 46% with contrast sensitivity.

Think about your color scheme and the contrast of colors to ensure that text is easily discernable from the background color. The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) recommend using a 4.5:1 contrast ratio for normal text. To put this into perspective, black text on a white background is 21:1 whereas gray text on a white background is 4.5:1.

Using color alone to convey information may not be accessible to those with visual impairments. For example, websites often use green to signal something positive and red to signal something negative, which can be difficult to discern for someone with a visual impairment. Instead, consider combining shapes or icons with color.

Key takeaways

  • Ensure your colors have ample contrast and combine color with graphics or symbols to help convey meaning.

Designing for accessibility does not need to be complex or costly. It just takes planning and the intentional application of accessibility principles to ensure a more inclusive experience for everyone.


Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.


About The Author

​Christi Olson is a Search Evangelist at Microsoft in Seattle, Washington. For over a decade Christi has been a student and practitioner of SEM. Prior to joining the Bing Ads team within Microsoft, Christi worked in marketing both in-house and at agencies at Point It, Expedia, Harry & David, and Microsoft (MSN, Bing, Windows). When she’s not geeking out about search and digital marketing she can be found with her husband at ACUO crossfit and running races across the PacificNW, brewing and trying to find the perfect beer, and going for lots of walks with their two schnauzers and pug.

Source link

To enable digital transformation, PwC set about changing employee mindsets

To enable digital transformation, PwC set about changing employee mindsets

PwC digital services marketing leader Stephanie Feldman on the keynote stage at the MarTech Conference.

SAN JOSE, CA —  “If I do my job right, it will go away because digital should be foundational and part of everything.” That’s what Stephanie Feldman said during her interview to become PwC’s digital services marketing leader two years ago.

Fast forward a year into her career at PwC, in spite of all the technology and data at its disposal, the company still had not met its digital transformation goals.

“We had to do something that people cared about,” said Feldman during her keynote presentation at the MarTech Conference in San Jose Friday. She knew a true digital transformation would require inspiring PwC’s workforce to embrace it.

Changing the mindset

Feldman’s plan consisted of three steps, the first of which involved changing employee mindset about technology.

“We fundamentally had to change mindsets and we did,” said Feldman. The company introduced a “BXT” process that tied together business, experience and technology, looking at company challenges from a holistic view. Part of the new process was finding new ways to get people thinking creatively.

“We were not going to rely on anything we’ve done in the past,” said Feldman.

More insights from the MarTech Conference

Creating a different model

Feldman previously had worked for a PR firm, running massive social campaigns. She leveraged her agency experience at PwC to tackle projects by bringing together writers, editors and designers.

The model worked, and now two years later, it’s used across many of PwC’s internal teams.

Part of the approach even included encouraging people to be comfortable in their environments — for example wearing casual clothes or jeans versus a business suit to work.

“Because when you’re comfortable, you’ll have that new layer of creativity,” said Feldman who keeps a “check your egos at the door” rule.

More insights from the MarTech Conference

Skills and tools training was a must

Feldman knew it wasn’t going to be as easy as saying hey, we’ve got new technology, use it!

“We knew that wouldn’t work,” said Feldman. She had to give people a way to grow in their careers as part of the incentive to adopt new technology.

PwC introduced a company-wide digital fitness assessment app. To get all 50,000 employees onboard, the company said it would close the office the week of July 4 if everyone completed their assessment by a specific date. Feldman said she did not do as well as she anticipated, but that it offered an opportunity to have honest conversations about the digital transformation efforts.

“If I lead marketing for the digital business and got a bad score, we may be in trouble,” said Feldman. The test shed light on vulnerabilities and ignited conversations between team members.

Digital transformation is a long game

“Change management is hard,” said Feldman, “Nothing is built overnight, but we can all have small victories along the way.”

Since introducing the BXT approach and launching the digital assessment app, the company’s martech has become exponentially more valuable, according to Feldman. She believes marketing enablement and empowerment is about inspiring your team and providing individuals with the opportunity to learn based on their specific work style.

“If you lead anyone, it is your job to come out of [this conference] and empower those people, because special things will come out of that interaction.”

This story first appeared on MarTech Today. For more on marketing technology, click here.


About The Author

Amy Gesenhues is Third Door Media’s General Assignment Reporter, covering the latest news and updates for Marketing Land and Search Engine Land. From 2009 to 2012, she was an award-winning syndicated columnist for a number of daily newspapers from New York to Texas. With more than ten years of marketing management experience, she has contributed to a variety of traditional and online publications, including MarketingProfs.com, SoftwareCEO.com, and Sales and Marketing Management Magazine. Read more of Amy’s articles.

Source link

Business evolution happens in experimentation sprints: Insights from André Morys, GO Group Digital

Business evolution happens in experimentation sprints: Insights from André Morys, GO Group Digital

Many executives are seeking a “digital transformation” as a lofty solution.

But transformative change really happens in sprints.

That’s because experimentation is the agile approach to business evolution.

When it comes to business evolution—you don’t know, what you don’t know. If you aren’t learning, your business is not evolving at the pace you need to surpass your competitors.

Let’s start with a story…

In the late 1990s, business leaders were hyped on the possibilities the internet offered. Countless start-ups sprouted up to get an early grasp on web business.

But by 2002, when the dot.com bubble burst, many companies struggled to survive. Companies like Pets.com, WorldCom, and WebVan failed completely, and other organizations experienced declining revenues after a period of optimistic growth.

WiderFunnel André Morys konversionsKRAFT
A young, confident André Morys with his business partner at the start of konversionsKRAFT in 1996. (Source: André Morys)

André Morys, Managing Partner of GO Group Digital and Co-Founder of konversionsKRAFT, lived through this experience. In the first five years, it seemed like he had hit pay dirt with his business. His team was confident about their future direction until 2002 when they struggled with declining revenue of 60% over three months.

But when André reflects back on his company’s history, this struggle provided an unprecedented opportunity to learn about leadership and finance, culture and motivation. The aftermath of the dot.com bubble accelerated his understanding of how to strategically evolve his business for future growth.

There are many parallels in today’s market. 52% of the Fortune 500 since 2000 don’t exist anymore. And business leaders are constantly battling this threat.

Today, many Executive teams are aspiring to the “digital transformation” solution because how can you keep pace with the market, with the rapid technological change?

WiderFunnel André Morys Unbounce CTA Conference Presentation GO Group Digital
André Morys, Managing Partner of GO Group Digital, presented “The Source of Disruption Is in the Mind of Your Customer” at Unbounce’s 2018 CTA conference.

In this post, you will learn key insights from André Morys, adapted from his presentation, “The Source of Disruption Is in the Mind of the Customer,” at Unbounce’s 2018 CTA conference.

These key insights include:

  • Why we should be focusing on velocity of learnings (not tests) by prioritizing impactful experiments
  • How to speak the same language as your Executive team by pinpointing their emotions and motivations
  • And why a valuable customer experience is at the heart of business evolution.

Scoping out the big picture: The Gartner Hype Cycle

Roy Amara, a researcher, scientist and futurist, claimed that we tend to overestimate the effects of technology in the short term and underestimate the effects in the long term. This phenomenon is called Amara’s Law.

When we think big picture about digital transformation, this forecast is true. We are hyped up on the new tools and technologies when we first adopt them, but once they present challenges, we can become discouraged. Because how can really leverage technology to solve our business problems?

WiderFunnel The Gartner Hype Cycle for Digital Transformation
The Gartner Hype Cycle is a framework for viewing the path from adoption to actually driving business decisions. (Source: Gartner )

The research firm, Gartner, furthered Amara’s Law by introducing the concept of a hype cycle. When it comes to experimentation, WiderFunnel traces the maturity of organizations through its five different stages, including:

  1. The Technology Trigger: You are excited at the possibilities of experimentation but business impact is yet to be proven at this initial stage.
  2. Peak of Inflated Expectations: Early adopters claim success with testing at this stage, but you might be failing to properly leverage experimentation as a strategy.
  3. The Trough of Disillusionment: Initial hype is tapering off. Internal ennthusiasm fades. You might recognize at this stage that experimentation must provide results to continue the investment.
  4. The Slope of Enlightenment: Experimentation is starting to show its possibilities as you understand how to better leverage testing to create business impact.
  5. And the Plateau of Productivity: With consistent bottom-line impacts, you can now start to leverage experimentation as an organizational strategy for business evolution.

Technology can be a solution to business evolution, but leaders need to strategize how to leverage technology to solve real business problems. André articulated that such challenges are actually what is driving your digital transformation.

WiderFunnel André Morys Digital Transformation
When you embrace the pain, you can start to understand the truth to make your business grow, according to André.

As you start to scale your experimentation program, these learnings make your team’s workflow more efficient and allow you to zero in on the hypotheses that can make the most impact.

The good news: You can accelerate your learnings for how to evolve your business through experimentation. Even if these seem small wins, compounded over time, you are truly driving your organization’s growth through digital technology. (For example, what is the calculated impact of a reported 2% lift over 50 experiments? It’s not 100%; it’s a compounded 264%!)

WiderFunnel Digital Transformation throug Experimentation
Experimentation is the agile approach to digital transformation. It facilitates data-driven decision making. (Source: André Morys)

Once organizations introduce a defined process and protocol, have systems and procedures in place for prioritizing experiments by impact, they are able to scale their programs for long-term business evolution.

Relevant resource

Addressing your strategic blind spots: The Dunning-Kruger Effect

It is far more common for people to allow ego to stand in the way of learning.

If you are relying on the HiPPO’s strategy for business evolution, how confident are you in their abilities? And do you think they have the competence to judge their limitations?

When André reflects back on his first five years of business before the dot.com bubble burst, he sees how his confidence was an example of the Dunning-Kruger Effect.

The Dunning-Kruger Effect is a cognitive bias where an individual with low ability have mistaken confidence and believe they are more competent than they are.

And people with high competence often view themselves as having lower abilities than in actuality. As André states, “You don’t know, what you don’t know.

WiderFunnel The Dunning-Kruger Effect
The Dunning-Kruger demonstrates how people with low abilities can overestimate their competency, and people with high abilities can underestimate their competency. Hello imposter syndrome!

This cognitive bias has been explored in depth by psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger. Their research shows that people that suffer from the Dunning-Kruger Effect may resist constructive criticism if it doesn’t align with their own self-perception. They may question the evaluation and even deem the process as flawed.

Kruger and Dunning’s interpretation is that accurately assessing skill level relies on some of the same core abilities as actually performing that skill, so the least competent suffer a double deficit. Not only are they incompetent, but they lack the mental tools to judge their own incompetence.

When it comes to innovation, the Dunning-Kruger Effect creates a blind spot for threats and opportunities that can affect your business success. Instead, a business leader needs to always interrogate their perception of reality to get closer to the truth.

Truth―more precisely, an accurate understanding of reality―is the essential foundation for producing good outcomes.

André now sees how the growth and learning that came out of the dot.com bubble challenged his own self-perception. He began to understand the implications of his business decisions, and he became more in tune with the possibilities of the unknown.

WiderFunnel André Morys konversionsKraft
Today, konversionsKraft has grown to a team of 85. The downturn from the dot.com bubble lead to increased learnings in growth, management, culture, finance, leadership, motivation, and more. (Source: André Morys)

Applying his own professional and personal learnings from this experience to the world of experimentation, André sees a chasm between the manager’s aspirations of digital transformation and the optimizer’s experiments that lead to the desired data-driven decision making.

The problem is that [the Dunning-Kruger Effect] happens in organizations all the time,” explains André.

Many optimizers are very skilled in experimentation, they know everything about it: about A/B Testing, confidence levels and statistics, testing tools and psychology. Whereas management has no idea; they don’t get it. They are talking about digital transformation as a big project, while their optimization team is really doing the work that is needed.

What makes André’s argument that organizations need to focus on learnings so compelling is that a culture of experimentation—testing and learning—can really drive your business evolution and lead to the hockey-stick growth that you need to sustain your market.

But the Executive team and the tactical experts need to get on the same page, especially when it comes to successful business evolution.

As an Optimization Champion, you are the catalyst.

Change-agents build bridges between their peers, empowering them to accept change as it comes. They understand how to build and nurture relationships in order to find common ground with others. They are organized and understand how to speak to c-level executives clearly.

André’s comparison of Optimization Champions and Executive teams within an organization with the Dunning-Kruger effect is insightful.

He argued that Optimization Champions have a high-level of competence, but they don’t understand how they can position their work to gain Executive buy-in because they are too immersed into their specialization.

But he also emphasized that Optimization Champions truly are the catalysts of digital transformation. His advice is simple: Optimization Champions need to speak the same language as the Executive team.

Optimizers should stop talking about uplifts and statistics and A/B tests. They should talk about what A/B testing changes within an organization. They should report business impact, not statistical confidence levels, so they are compatible, so they are speaking at the manager’s level.

Experimentation drives the digital transformation at many successful organizations. Just look at Airbnb, or Uber, or Facebook. These organizations test and learn their way to business evolution.

André points out that experimentation facilitates an organization’s digital transformation, but many managers just don’t know it yet.

Your communication of experimentation’s value needs to be accessible to those who aren’t educated in the technical aspects.

And that’s exactly what André recommends. Understand your experimentation program’s internal stakeholders—your Executive team. Understand their fears and anxieties, their emotions and motivations when communicating your experimentation program’s value.

WiderFunnel André Morys Evangelizing experimentation personas of internal stakeholders
André recommends creating personas for your internal stakeholders so you can communicate the value of your experimentation program in a way that they’ll appreciate. (Source: André Morys)

As a marketer, you are best prepared for this task as you can craft your internal stakeholder’s persona, so you can demonstrate—in their language—the impact of your program on the business.

Featured Resource

Build your internal stakeholder persona to get buy-in!

Dive into the emotions and motivations that will resonate with your internal stakeholders to start proving the value of your experimentation program.

In your experimentation sprints, prioritize business impact over speed.

If you’re not failing, you’re not pushing your limits, and if you’re not pushing your limits, you’re not maximizing your potential.

In the world of experimentation, there is an emphasis on experimentation velocity. It makes sense: the more tests that you are running, the more insights you can obtain about your business.

But the buzz around velocity has led many leaders to focus on speed, rather than the quality of insights and the business impact of experiments.

And if you aren’t focusing on business impact, you’ll never get on the same page as your Executive team.

If you decide to test many ideas, quickly, you are sacrificing your ability to really validate and leverage an idea. One winning A/B test may mean quick conversion rate lift, but it doesn’t mean you’ve explored the full potential of that idea.

Experimentation sprints are chock full of business insights and impact—exactly what organizations need to continuously evolve their businesses.

That’s why our emphasis as optimizers should be on velocity of learnings, not just experiments.

It’s an agile approach to business evolution. And that’s a sentiment that was echoed by Johnny Russo, in “The 5 Pillars of Digital Transformation Strategy at Mark’s.”

Because how do we process all this change and learning, without being efficient?” he described.

Those organizations first to adapt will be most prepared. And so I think the foundation has to be an agile methodology.

But optimizers need to ensure they are driving higher impact experiments and deeper learnings by implementing rigorous processes. A prioritization framework ensures you are launching experiments that have the highest potential for results, on the most important areas of your business, with the easiest implementation.

But to increase experiment velocity, you need a defined optimization process.

According to the “State of Experimentation Maturity 2018” original research report, experiment velocity is a focal point for most organizations.

WiderFunnel State of Experimentation Maturity Velocity Increase
The majority of both Small and Medium Enterprises (52%) and Large Enterprises (64%) plan to increase experiment velocity in the next 12 months.

52% of Small and Medium Enterprises and 64% of Large Enterprises in the survey indicated they plan to increase experiment velocity in the next year.

However, only 24% and 23% (respectively) of these organizations plan to increase budget, which can only add emphasis on workflow efficiency and prioritization so that you are not straining your resources.

One of the most common roadblocks to increasing velocity is workflow efficiency. Review and document your workflows from ideation to analysis to ensure seamless experiment execution,” explains Natasha Wahid in the research report.

Another common roadblock is a lack of resources, particularly in Design and Web Development. Ensure you have the right team in place to up your velocity, and plan for possible bottlenecks.

As André articulated, focusing on business impact instead of speed will ensure you are learning faster than your competition.

That’s because digital transformation is not about implementing technology, it’s about leveraging technology to accelerate your business.

How to use the PIE Prioritization Framework to identify the most impactful experiments.

You can’t test everywhere or everything at once. With limited time and resources and, most importantly, limited traffic to allocate to each test, prioritization is a key part of your experimentation plan.

Prioritizing where you invest energy will give you better returns by emphasizing pages that are more important to your business.

The PIE Framework is made up of the three criteria you should consider to prioritize which pages to test and in which order: Potential, Importance, and Ease.

WiderFunnel PIE Prioritization Framework
The PIE Prioritization framework allows you to zero in on those experiments that can drive the most business impact. That’s how you get executive-level buy-in!

Potential: How much improvement can be made on this page(s)? You should prioritize your worst performers. This should take into account your web analytics data, customer data, and expert heuristic analysis of user scenarios.

Importance: How valuable is the traffic to this page(s)? Your most important pages are those with the highest volume and the costliest traffic. You may have identified pages that perform terribly, but if they don’t have significant volume of costly traffic, they aren’t experimentation priorities.

Ease: How difficult will it be to implement an experiment on a page or template? The final consideration is the degree of difficulty of actually running a test on this page, which includes technical implementation, and organizational or political barriers.

The less time and resources you need to invest for the same return, the better. This includes both technical and “political” ease. A page that would be technically easy to test on may have many stakeholders or vested interests that can cause barriers (like your homepage, for example).

You can quantify each of your potential opportunities based on these criteria to create your test priority list. We use the PIE Framework in a table to turn all of these data inputs into an objective number ranking.

Learn more about PIE

Seek the “truth” in a delightful customer experience.

Imagine your a taxi service. And you are seeing Uber’s market success as a threat to your livelihood.

What makes them more successful?

Get out the whiteboards and some might write: “We need an app!” or “We need to hire a data scientist!” Because on the superficial level, data and technology seem pivotal to a digital transformation.

But when you look deeper at Uber’s strategy, you will see that they focus on delighting their customers with their experience.

And because of Uber’s success, how people get rides has radically changed.

WiderFunnel Uber Growth Customer Experience
Look at the hockey-stick growth of Uber. It’s all attributed to a valuable customer experience. (Source: Spaceotechnologies.com )

But Uber is not the only example.

Many businesses have transformed the market through delightful customer experiences.

Amazon makes online ordering a breeze. No more long wait times, André joked that he has to slow down their service so that he will actually be there to accept the order.

And Airbnb—they’ve made vacationing a unique and desirable experience.

André, an expert in emotional marketing and the Limbic Model, emphasized the need to go beyond conversions and focus on a customer experience that delights.

Companies who fail to embrace CX as strategic path to growth won’t just be lagging, they’ll get left behind.

And that’s because you can drive experiments with the most business impact by honing in on your customer experience.

That means, you have to understand your customer—their fears and anxieties, their thoughts and desires—when designing an experience to meet their emotional needs and states.

The most successful organizations have honed in on what makes their experience delightful. In “Moving the needle: Strategic metric setting for your experimentation program,” I talked about creating a True North metric that align to your value proposition, as a way of creating internal focus on your customer experience.

Slack, a team collaboration program focuses on optimizing for teams that send over 2,000 messages.

LinkedIn focuses on quality sign-up, ensuring that new users are actively making connections on the social platform.

And Facebook optimizes for new users who make 10 friends in seven days.

See it’s not tools and technologies that evolve these businesses. It’s how they leverage digital technologies across the organization to solve real business problems.

And when you align your customer experience goals with your experimentation program, you are the competition.

You learn and adapt with each new experiment to what your customer wants and needs from your experience. That’s how you drive business impact. That’s how you get internal buy-in.

But what’s more—that’s how you stay relevant in the market.

And if you are experimenting, keep slogging through the “trough of disillusionment”.

André Morys knows from experience that business that do, can reach enlightenment.

What are your biggest challenges with experimentation that can be attributed to the “trough of disillusionment”? We’d love to hear your comments!

Author

Lindsay Kwan

Marketing Communications Specialist

In this roadmap for the executive, we explore the biggest challenges faced by enterprise organizations as they work to embed experimentation within their infrastructure – and how to surmount them.

Get your roadmap

Source link

The future of the digital customer experience: 6 experimentation trends for disruptive businesses in 2019

The future of the digital customer experience: 6 experimentation trends for disruptive businesses in 2019

You are the catalyst for future growth.

This past September, hundreds of specialists at organizations across industry verticals flocked to #Opticon18, the largest experimentation conference in North America; and it was clear; the driving force is you—the Optimization Champion.

Experimentation as a strategy for future business evolution and innovation is happening now.

The most successful organizations are experimenting (or at least planning to!) across all customer touchpoints. Because customer experience is king.

To keep pace, you’ll need to stay on the pulse of what’s happening with experimentation: new tech and tool developments, the latest strategies for scaling experimentation, and the emerging trends that will define your business in the future.

Because your ability to adapt will lay the foundation for the radical change that is set to happen in the business world:

The next 10 years will generate an order of magnitude more change than we have seen in the last 10 years.

Brian Hopkins, Ted Schadler, and James McCormick

In 2019, you will want to accelerate your strategy with these six experimentation trends that will pave the future of your digital customer experience:

Trend 1: The currency of business insights

Customer data, machine learning algorithms, the latest technology stack—no technological development is worth implementing if you can’t leverage that data into business insights.

Business insights are the valuable intel that allows you to experiment and evolve. To innovate and proliferate your learnings across your entire organization.

Data is the red blood of an insights-driven business—there can never be enough flowing in the veins. Look always to tap more—and more relevant—data.

Brian Hopkins, Ted Schadler, and James McCormick

Your ability to accelerate the speed and transmission of insights across different teams is the currency of the future. Business insights will underpin the radical change we will see in the next 10 years.

Data analytics and software enable insights-driven organizations to sift through an immense amount of information to glean transferable insights.

Because this trend hinges on human intelligence: the ability to accumulate a large quantity of quality data sources and to be able to glean actionable insights. Insights that reveal something about your systems and processes, your product or services, and especially your customer:

Insights-driven businesses bring insight, not just data, into every decision, and they know exactly how to use them for greatest advantage across the entire customer life cycle. For these firms, digital insights and what they do with them are their secret weapons to disrupt your market and steal your customers.

Brian Hopkins, Ted Schadler, and James McCormick

But more importantly, the most successful organizations will find ways to close the loop—bring insights forward and experiment with them at different touchpoints.

Insights-Driven Experimentation

The flow of insights drives your experimentation program, maximizing your organizational learning capacity.

Share the insight:

You must democratize your data and insights so anyone in the organization can harness them for an improved customer experience.

At Uber, for instance, 50% of their employees have access to an insights database which helps to inform their decision making on a daily basis, according to the Forrester report.

Because information is power.

There are many things that you need to get right to create internal alignment and scale insights across the enterprise. However the most important is having the executive team demanding this approach and a top-down strategy guiding the synchronization of teams around a common practice.

But this is a challenge for any traditional, non-agile organization.

In fact, Brian Hopkins, Ted Schadler and James McCormick predict that insights-driven businesses will grow eight times faster than the projected 3.5% global GDP Growth. More granularly, their predictions include that insights-driven public companies will grow 27% annually and startups will grow 40%.

But this might not be possible without the top-level support of changed processes and systems.

What processes and protocol can you document to ensure that business insights are spread throughout your organization?

A Marketer’s take on this trend

The dissemination of insights is crucial if you really want to move your organization forward. The learnings you generate from experimentation can’t live in a single team – particularly those insights about your customer’s emotional states and contexts. Because these insights can most likely be applied and tested at many touch points throughout your business.

Now is the time to figure out what systems you need in place to ensure the right people have access to insights from data, experimentation, and customer research. This may be as simple as an experiment insights archive, or it may require a more intentional dissemination effort.

Natasha Wahid

Marketing Lead

Resources to get you started…

Trend 2: The cross-organizational experimentation mindset

Thomas Edison would be thrilled to be alive today, if he could see the stuff that is really going on, the stuff that you are all doing.

It’s not a surprise that Forrester analysts predict unprecedented growth for insights-driven businesses in the next decade. Experimentation refines ideas into validated insights, evolving the digital customer experience.

And with more organizations adopting the experimentation mindset of testing and learning across every department, the ability to generate and leverage business insights increases exponentially.

In the next 10 years, we will see widespread adoption of experimentation across all touch points to validate all marketing activity and focus our limited time and resources on the high-impact areas.

Nick So

Director of Strategy

The future of the digital customer experience is through experimentation. In the next 10 years, you will see more and more organizations experimenting across every customer touchpoint, in order to optimize their entire journey.

Your first step is to de-silo experimentation in your organization. Instead of relegating experimentation as a side-strategy, organizations will need to implement the structures and processes to enable experimentation in every team.

To become a true experimentation organization, you need scale and scope. Scale is about running many experiments and scope is about getting all groups across an organization to participate in experiments.

The most successful organizations are already on board with cross-organizational experimentation. According to Stefan Thomke, at organizations like P&G, Uber, Airbnb, or Bing, experimentation is going on at all times.

[At Bing, at] any point in time, there’s billions and trillions of variations,” explains Stefan Thomke. “And by the way, the success rate at Bing, alone, is only 10-20% of what they try.

WiderFunnel High Velocity Experimentation Examples

Real-world examples of experimentation at scale

The most successful organizations are experimenting at a high velocity, gathering insights from both winning and losing variations.

Share the insight:

And despite a low win-rate, these organizations are investing in experimentation as their cross-organizational strategy. Because it’s not about winning or losing — that’s thinking too small, too immediate.

That’s because experimentation competency across their organization is their competitive advantage. They are testing large-scale and high-velocity because they involve every team, every department. Experimentation is all about gathering business insights.

At its peak maturity, experimentation is a cultural mindset that spans across organizational departments, marketing channels, and throughout executive management.

So where do you get started? We’ve got it figured out.

The 5 pillars of an effective experimentation program

Cross-organization experimentation requires a scaling strategy. It requires focused intention, a multi-pronged approach to your process, your metrics, your culture, your expertise, and your tech stack.

Based on years of analysis of experimentation programs, and through surveying Optimization Champions at organizations all over North America in “State of Experimentation Maturity 2018” report, we’ve identified what makes the most successful programs gain traction across departments, across activities.

And it’s called the PACET framework.

The PACET Framework

WiderFunnel PACET framework for scaling experimentation

WiderFunnel’s PACET Framework

By focusing on the five core pillars of process, accountability, culture, expertise, and technology, you can scale and mature your experimentation program.

Share the insight:

Our findings informed WiderFunnel’s framework: PACET. And it includes these five pillars:

Process

This pillar includes an organization’s experimentation protocol and methodology, process for ideation and prioritization, experiment design, and measurement of success.

Accountability

The most mature organizations keep process and accountability at the core of their experimentation strategy, fuelling how experiments are developed, and results are analyzed, understood, and leveraged.

Culture

Culture is crucial when defining experimentation maturity: Does your organization celebrate testing and learning? Are people encouraged to try (and fail) and try again?

This pillar includes organizational buy-in for experimentation, program support from the C-level, and cross-team participation in an experimentation program.

Expertise

An experimentation program needs expertise and resources. The amount of time and full-time team members dedicated to experimentation is reflective of an organization’s maturity.

This pillar includes people and skill sets: strategists, analysts, designers, developers, project managers, product owners, third-party partners, as well as hours dedicated to experimentation.

Technology

Experimentation maturity requires a well-rounded technology stack. Experimentation and personalization tools, visitor engagement tools, customer data tools, project management tools. Mature organizations have the right tools in place to ensure they can develop the best possible hypotheses and have reliable data.

Your first step is to evaluate how developed each of these core pillars are within your organization, so you can set your sights on your future growth.

Trend 3: Empowered product experimentation

Experimentation has become the product. Your product is the culmination of user feedback and quantitative data tied to your business goals. And experimentation is the engine that brings it all together to validate the way forward.

Just as Stefan Thomke mentioned, your experimentation program’s scale and scope are essential for driving your future growth. If you are considering how to grow your program, empowered product experimentation should be your next step.

There are numerous untapped opportunities:

Server-side experimentation has really opened up what is possible with product experimentation. Allowing development teams to build experimentation directly into their sprints and workflows,” clarifies Thomas Davis, Senior Web Developer at WiderFunnel.

WiderFunnel Experimentation in Product Development Cycle

The product lifecycle

You can experiment deeper into your stack with product experimentation, including with machine learning algorithms, log-in states, and more.

Share the insight:

But besides the ability to experiment throughout the development lifecycle, you also have the opportunity to maximize your digital customer experience by building off the value that is already created.

Successful product managers create an experience that delights, an experience that meets the customer’s emotional needs and states in the context of your product. And continuous and iterative experimentation makes certain that you are moving toward this end goal.

You can heighten the positive emotions that your customer experiences, and minimize the friction points to make it more sticky.

And that experimentation mindset will be critical to ensuring the longevity of your product in the marketplace.

A Developer’s take on the trend

Nothing is more frustrating than building out a fully integrated feature that has a negative effect on the business. Product experimentation stops developers wasting time building out fully polished features that will just be rolled back.

Thomas Davis

Senior Web Developer

Trend 4: The evolution of the Digital Experience Stack

Delivering exceptional customer experiences at scale is high-pressure for the disruptive business leader. It’s a fast-paced market and they know they have to keep up.

Marketing is a ‘jack-of-all-trades’ discipline,” explains Sergiy Bondarenko, Marketing Operations Analyst at WiderFunnel.

Marketers have to be experts in copywriting, sales, design, psychology, web technology, app technology, SEO, paid traffic acquisition and demand generation, social media, public relations, etc.

Naturally, there isn’t a single person who can excel in all these disciplines. This is where many tool vendors come in, promising to ‘fill gaps’, and marketers fall into the trap of thinking a tool can replace skills.

When it comes to technology, gone are the days of finding that traditional one-tool solution. These legacy suites evolve slowly, delivering mediocre results across the board. At that pace, how could you ever stand out amongst your competitors?

Insights-driven businesses are 137% more likely to differentiate with data and analytics.

But implementing new tools and technologies without an overarching martech strategy will lead to poor results as well.

Since 2007, we have gone from ~150 martech vendors to over ~7,000 in 2018. Unsurprisingly, marketers are now suffering from the ‘shiny object’ syndrome—every new tool promises to solve every problem there is, and if it’s trendy, then it’s almost an obligation to work it into the existing workflow—or risk being seen as a laggard.

Sergiy Bondarenko

Marketing Operations Analyst

The new Digital Experience Stack is an innovative solution, particularly for those disruptive businesses that want the best of the tech worlds.

WiderFunnel The Digital Experience Stack DXS
Some of the best-in-class tools have partnered to create The Digital Experience Stack (DXS). Source: Optimizely.

And it ensures you have the well-rounded technology stack to empower your organization’s experimentation at scale.

If you have 100 tools that are fragmented, don’t have an open API, and are sparsely used, then you have a problem on your hands,” states Sergiy Bondarenko.

Firstly, team productivity and happiness will suffer. This will eventually trickle down into underperforming operational metrics and will have a negative impact on the KPIs.

A bloated martech stack also means a bloated budget, and you never want to have a bloated marketing budget—it creates tension and a lack of trust with organizational leaders like the CEO and CFO.

And no organization wants that.

An Experimentation Strategist’s take on the trend

The digital experience stack is a great approach that enables businesses to work with a diverse range of best-in-class technologies, and enables technology companies to continue to focus on their area of expertise. Collaboration, not competition, to better support the industry as a whole.

James Flory

Senior Experimentation Strategist

Trend 5: The re-framing of personalization

Experimentation ensures that businesses are innovating and evolving. But, it doesn’t mean that it is a separate strategy. It is the underpinning methodology of getting any and every strategy right.

Personalization is just one technique within the methodology of experimentation.

It’s not one or the other.

So, your experimentation team shouldn’t be siloed from your personalization efforts.

We’ve seen a lot of hype around personalization in recent years, but many organizations are only aspiring to the level where they can deliver individualized experiences to their customers. That’s the 1:1 experiences that many tools claim to provide.

WiderFunnel Marketing Personalization
Providing a more customized user experience often starts with segmenting your audience, but any personalization tactic needs to be validated through experimentation.

But, as Mike St. Laurent, Director of Experimentation Strategy and Product Development Lead points out: “Most companies do not have the necessary data collection and segmentation capabilities in place to even be thinking about personalization as a strategy.

2019 will be the year of laying the technical groundwork so that companies have the tools they need to test relevant customer experiences effectively.

Mike St. Laurent

Director of Experimentation Strategy and Product Development Lead

You also need to keep in mind that any tactic needs to be proven; not every implementation of personalization will deliver results.

If you have an idea on how to leverage personalization in your strategy, validate your hypotheses through experimentation.

The end goal is to create digital experiences that are highly relevant to the customer in your business context. But you should only want that as a means of generating a higher customer lifetime value.

An Experimentation Strategist’s take on the trend

Creating relevant experiences can be an effective way to improve conversions, but companies are realizing they shouldn’t be personalizing just to say they are doing it.

Companies are starting to understand that just because something is “personalized” doesn’t mean it’s more effective. A personalized experience needs to be tested the same as any other change to a digital experience.

Mike St. Laurent

Director of Experimentation Strategy and Product Development Lead

Get well-versed on this topic…

Trend 6: True customer empathy

Businesses have long been trying to solve their customer’s pain points. But what has been missing from the conversation is true customer empathy.

Because you don’t want your customer to only have their problem solved. You want them to feel an affiliation with your brand and with your experience. You want them to be delighted.

widerfunnel customer delight
Are you creating delight for the individuals who are your customers?

True customer empathy means understanding your customer’s full spectrum of emotions within your experience: knowing what emotions they feel when their expectations are met and how they feel when their expectations are not met.

In the digital world, customers can access your brand on many touch points: social media, email newsletters, your website. All of which offers plenty of opportunities to connect with your customers.

Where are the points of friction and where are the points of delight in your experience?

Unfortunately, at least one unintended bad customer experience is part and parcel of any new launch; companies simply can’t predetermine how every part of their customers’ experience is impacted by design or development decisions made during the feature development process.

A crucial post-launch practice at FullStory is something we call ‘game film‘—a process where we auto-play sessions of users interacting with the new feature and note down how many bad experiences they encounter.

Whether through game film or some other practice, the point is that everyone should have a built-in mechanism to monitor these empathy-inducing moments of frustration for customers.

Jordan Woods

Marketing at FullStory

True customer empathy leads to an understanding of how you can maximize and minimize the feelings your customer experiences at these different points within your experience, so that your brand can align more closely with your customer’s emotional needs and states.

In 2005, when Bain & Company surveyed 362 firms, 80% of companies stated that they were customer centric. That sounds promising until you consider their customers’ response: Only 8% of customers agreed.

Clearly, there is a disconnect.

So, how can you get deeper than demographics to not only understand your customer, but to anticipate their emotional response? How can your organization become genuinely empathetic to their customers?

Start by listening to your customers at every touchpoint.

Marketing Trends Customer Journey
The customer experience is a holistic journey across multiple touchpoints. Having empathy for your customer’s emotional needs and states is crucial for making their experience delightful.

Live chat. Social media listening. Customer surveys. These methods are a starting point. But true customer empathy only comes from deep inquiry and the thick data that results:

Research techniques — such as contextual inquiry, diary studies, ethnographic research and others — can generate thick data that allows you to understand your customer’s emotional needs.

True customer empathy is also a rich source of hypothesis ideation. You can validate this deep understanding of your customer through experimentation to see if your hypotheses stand true.

A UX Researcher’s take on the trend

People will always be the centre of any business. Understanding those people — your users — and their circumstances will help you generate powerful hypotheses. But the key is to take these insights forward through each of your experiments to drive and scale a sophisticated experimentation program.

Kim Quach

UX Research Specialist

Remember what you do now counts.

Your leadership, your strategies, your experiments are driving your organization into the future. What you do now accelerates the growth of your company.

It takes just one person to lead the change. The more you embrace the trends and technologies of the future, the more ready you are to embrace the pace of change.

But know that you don’t have to bear the burden alone.

Build the right insights partnerships – don’t go it alone. You probably won’t own all the data, expertise, or technology. We expect most companies to work with a wide variety of insights services partners.

Brian Hopkins, Ted Schadler, and James McCormick

You can still lead the charge.

As the more determined you are to push the boundaries of how your organization operates, the more likely you can evolve with the rapid growth that your organization can facilitate through experimentation.

But it’s not just about you and your organization—it’s about your organization’s purpose, your vision—the reason why behind your work.

And that is your customers.

Because a delightful digital experience is how your brand stays relevant—now and in the next decade.

What trends stand out as most important to your future growth? Let’s start a conversation in the comment section below.

Author

Lindsay Kwan

Marketing Communications Specialist

Benchmark your experimentation maturity with our new 7-minute maturity assessment and get proven strategies to develop an insight-driving growth machine.

Get started

Source link